Posts

Father Purcell makes major contributions to North Idaho

By Robert Singletary Special To The Coeur d’Alene Press| December 18, 2020 1:00 AM Thomas J. Purcell was born in Wales of Irish parents in 1868. He came to the U.S. with his parents when he was about 12 years old. After working in the Pennsylvania coal mines as a teenager, he made his way west, first…

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When trains collide

November 20, 2020 1:00 AM (in part from the Spokesman-Review July 31,1909) The 1909 Homestead Act opened up a large area of land south of Coeur d’Alene whereby citizens could enter their names in a lottery for a chance to homestead a large parcel of land. For 22 days, July 25 to Aug. 5, 1909,…

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Marcus Wright: The Tie King of North Idaho

By By ROBERT SINGLETARY/Special To The Coeur d’Alene Press Robert Singletary Special To The Press| November 13, 2020 1:00 AM Marcus Wright, a native of Kentucky, moved to the village of Spokane Falls in 1877. By the early 1880s he had formed a partnership with Charles Wesley Wood and together they platted the town Rathdrum. At the…

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The man behind Hamilton House

By By DEBORAH AKERS MITCHELL| October 30, 2020 1:00 AM With all the recent articles about saving the Hamilton House, it is time to learn about the person who built it — Boyd Hamilton, second mayor of Coeur d’Alene. It was 1903. The small town of Coeur d’Alene was beginning to grow, and the second bank, the…

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Prohibition prognosticator pushes peanut

October 5, 2020 1:00 AM In 1909, Kootenai County citizens voted to outlaw liquor sales and become a “dry” county. The “drys” won by a narrow margin of 164 votes. So, for the next two years the prohibition debate continued. In 1911, it was once again put on the ballot. Some said that the proprietor…

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Cd’A went ‘dry’ ahead of its time

By By RICHARD SHELDON/Museum Of North Idaho| September 11, 2020 12:30 AM First of two parts As the United States entered the 20th century, two important issues came together in a manner that would forever change our culture and economics. The first issue was the decades old and ever-increasing pressure for the country to enact laws which…

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Navy recruit torched new civic center

By By ROBERT SINGLETARY/Special To The Coeur d’Alene Press| September 4, 2020 1:00 AM In 1935 plans were underway to build a new civic center in the Coeur d’Alene City Park, replacing the 1905 dance pavilion. Construction began on March 8, 1935, and was completed in the fall of 1937. Most of the labor was provided by…

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Treaty Rock and ‘Little Falls’

| September 2, 2020 1:00 AM Saturday’s edition of The Coeur d’Alene Press, Aug. 22, published my short history of Treaty Rock. Mark Weadick raised the question, “… which falls on the Spokane River were actually purchased from Chief Seltice?” He points out that there is a “Little Falls” on the Spokane River, but 60 miles…

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Treaty Rock: What happened?

| August 22, 2020 1:00 AM No treaty was signed there. No handshake or other customary method of sealing a deal was performed here. So, what’s the big deal? Here is the story. Fredrick Post was born in Germany in 1821. He married at age 26 and a year later, in 1848, he immigrated from Germany…

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Hazel Cardwell, pioneer educator

By Robert Singletary| August 7, 2020 1:00 AM Hazel Elizabeth Cardwell, pioneer educator and native of Coeur d’Alene, was born on May 2, 1891. As a child, she witnessed the last days of Fort Sherman and Coeur d’Alene’s population boom during the early 1900s. She graduated from Coeur d’Alene High School in 1910 and started her teaching…

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