October 5, 2020 1:00 AM In 1909, Kootenai County citizens voted to outlaw liquor sales and become a “dry” county. The “drys” won by a narrow margin of 164 votes. So, for the next two years the prohibition debate continued. In 1911, it was once again put on the ballot. Some said that the proprietor…

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By By RICHARD SHELDON/Museum Of North Idaho| September 11, 2020 12:30 AM First of two parts As the United States entered the 20th century, two important issues came together in a manner that would forever change our culture and economics. The first issue was the decades old and ever-increasing pressure for the country to enact laws which…

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| August 22, 2020 1:00 AM No treaty was signed there. No handshake or other customary method of sealing a deal was performed here. So, what’s the big deal? Here is the story. Fredrick Post was born in Germany in 1821. He married at age 26 and a year later, in 1848, he immigrated from Germany…

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By Robert Singletary| August 7, 2020 1:00 AM Hazel Elizabeth Cardwell, pioneer educator and native of Coeur d’Alene, was born on May 2, 1891. As a child, she witnessed the last days of Fort Sherman and Coeur d’Alene’s population boom during the early 1900s. She graduated from Coeur d’Alene High School in 1910 and started her teaching…

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By Richard Sheldon| July 24, 2020 1:00 AM On Oct. 29, 1907, The Coeur d’Alene Press announced the United States District Court in Moscow had started the trial of Coeur d’Alene resident William Dollar, who was the owner of the Exchange National Bank in Coeur d’Alene. Along with Mr. Dollar as defendants were St. Maries residents George…

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By Robert Singletary| July 10, 2020 1:00 AM Teresa Graham was one of the most prominent and influential women in North Idaho during the first half of the 20th Century. She came to Coeur d’Alene in 1890 at the age of 21 from London, Ontario. In 1896, she married James W. Graham, a prominent attorney and community…

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By Dick Sheldon| June 19, 2020 1:00 AM No one really believed they would actually do it. But, on Sept. 20, 1974, Chairwomen of the Kootenai Tribal Council Amy Trice and Doug Wheaton, community representative for the Tribe, formally notified the U.S. government that a state of war existed between the Tribe and the U.S. The issue…

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By Julie Gibbs| June 5, 2020 1:00 AM A close look at the three-story building dominating the southwest corner of Sherman Avenue and Fifth Street reveals two clues to its history. The words “City Hall” appear above the elaborate arched entry and the inscription, “Erected 1908” is chiseled on the cornerstone. Between 1900-1910, Coeur d’Alene’s population and…

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By Richard Sheldon| May 22, 2020 1:00 AM On the eastern side of Lake Coeur d’Alene is beautiful Carlin Bay. It is approximately 10 miles from Fort Sherman. Who was the man honored by having such a beautiful place named in his memory? William Passmore Carlin was born on Nov. 23, 1829, in Rich Woods, Ill. He…

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By Richard Sheldon| May 8, 2020 1:00 AM What rankles in Bob Launhardt’s mind is the issue of what caused the disastrous and deadly 1972 Sunshine Mine fire that caused the deaths of 91 miners. Robert E. (Bob) Launhardt was born in 1931 into a Midwest farm family, the second of five children. By the time he…

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