By CRAIG NORTHRUPStaff Writer, CDA Press | May 10, 2021 1:09 AM The Museum of North Idaho has announced the J.C. White House will hold its first in-person event since moving from its original Sherman Avenue location in November of 2019. James Supp, an appraiser for Coronado Trading Company, will come to the J.C. White House — the…

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By ROBERT SINGLETARY, Special to the Press In the fall of 1940, Earl Somers and his wife Byrd, moved to Coeur d’Alene with the idea of building an amusement park. Earl organized the Coeur d’Alene Lakeside Development Company and began meeting with city officials about leasing land for his amusement park near the new Civic Center in…

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By Robert Singletary, Special to the Nickel’s Worth On October 11, 1906, boat builder P.W. Johnson launched the Flyer, one of the most popular steamboats on Lake Coeur d’Alene. The Flyer was one of many steamboats that was owned and operated by J.C. White and his navigation company, the Red Collar Line. White started his steamboat business…

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By Robert Singletary Special for the Nickel’s Worth The history of the motion picture industry had its beginning in the late 1800s. By the early 1900s, the making and showing of movies was developing into a major industry. There were over a dozen movie theaters in northern Idaho by 1911. Three of those, the Alene Theater, the Edison,…

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By Robert Singletary In 1902, Frederick Blackwell, a wealthy lumberman from Williamsport, Penn., came to Coeur d’Alene to invest in the emerging timber industry. In addition to developing one of the largest timber empires in northern Idaho, he became involved in railroad building, banking, tourism and recreation.  In 1905, he constructed one of the most attractive…

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By BILL BULEYStaff Writer, Coeur d’Alene Press | March 3, 2021 1:00 AM COEUR d’ALENE — Robert Singletary knows Kootenai County’s history perhaps better than anyone. Even he thinks so. When asked if anyone knows this area’s history as well as he does, Singletary smiles and pauses before answering. “Probably not.” He quickly adds that’s he’s not bragging.…

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By Robert Singletary For twenty years, 1878 to 1898, the military band at Fort Coeur d’Alene/Sherman provided much of the musical entertainment for the village of Coeur d’Alene. After the closure of the fort in 1898, the town was without an organized band for several years. On March 12, 1907, Professor James Austin organized the first…

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Written by Robert Singletary for the Nickel’s Worth 2/12/2021 The first sawmill to operate in northern Idaho was built in 1878 by the U.S. Army on land near the Spokane River. Under the command of Col. Henry Clay Merriman, a detachment of cavalry hauled the machinery for a small circular saw with steam power from…

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Coeur d’Alene Press| January 30, 2021 1:00 AM Excerpted from Coeur d’Alene’s Parks and Recreation 24-page “Walking Tour of The Forest Cemetery” Over 140 years ago, the U.S. Army established a 1-acre cemetery for Fort Sherman near what we know today as Government Way. When the fort was decommissioned in 1900, the bodies of 37 soldiers…

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